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Knox County criminal defense attorney drug possession

If you are a parent, you know that it is far from uncommon for teens to push the limits. Their desire for independence can lead them to defy your rules, any regulations set by their high school, and even legal limits that apply to all Americans. Testing the limits is not always a bad thing, but when drugs and alcohol are involved, things can quickly take a turn for the worse. For those who are at the legal drinking age, the blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limit is 0.08 percent. For those under 21, Tennessee law enforcement has no tolerance for a BAC over zero. Unfortunately, many teens will get behind the wheel after drinking or doing drugs, assuming that they are OK to drive, but then they end up facing driving under the influence (DUI) charges. Such penalties often lead to losing your driver’s license, but what about other drug or alcohol violations that were not committed while driving?

Drug Free Youth Act Offenses

For those between the ages of 13 and 17, the Tennessee Drug Free Youth Act allows a court to limit your driving privileges if the minor faces any form of drug charges—even those not committed while driving. This includes any criminal offenses, violations, status offenses, or infractions that involve the possession, sale, use, or consumption of any controlled substance. The severity of the penalties correlates with the number of offenses that the minor has on his or her record.

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Anderson County criminal defense attorney juvenile crime

Finding out that your child has broken the law and is facing criminal charges for his or her mistake is a difficult pill for parents to swallow. You are likely feeling a combination of emotions—anger and disappointment in your child, concern for his or her future, as well as confusion regarding how the Tennessee court system works for minors. If your child is facing juvenile charges and this is your first time dealing with the Tennessee court system, you may be bursting with questions about how the legal process will work and where your child will end up afterward. It is always advisable to speak with an experienced criminal defense attorney who is familiar with the juvenile court system before taking any further action, but we have compiled a list of frequently asked questions to inform you about the process moving forward.

  1. Is a juvenile hearing just like an adult trial? The short answer to this question is no. While the legal process will still occur in a courtroom in front of a judge and both juveniles and adults have the right to an attorney, juveniles have certain rights that adult offenders do not. For instance, juveniles have a level of confidentiality to their records that adults are not given. Alternatively, juveniles are not allowed a jury trial or the opportunity for bail. 

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Union County juvenile crimes attorney

To some, cyberbullying may seem like a phenomenon that is dramatized on television, but with the rise of technology and cell phones in the hands of young people, cyberbullying is a real issue that many children face. It is not uncommon for minors to get caught up in cyberbullying, since many may not recognize that what they are doing is considered bullying. The good and the bad thing about technology is that it records everything. In other words, if your son or daughter has been a victim of cyberbullying or has been the one sending the mean messages, there is likely evidence that can be used for or against them. For those being bullied, this can lead to the necessary justice that may not be possible without technology. However, for those doing this bullying, this could lead to juvenile criminal charges in Tennessee.

What Actions Are Considered “Cyberbullying?”

Cyberbullying holds the same weight and meaning as any other form of bullying, but it involves actions committed through electronic means. Schools can take action against any form of bullying or harassment to try to protect their students. In Tennessee, any of the following can be considered harassment, intimidation, or bullying:

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