Call Us865-281-1000

Bank of America Building
550 Main Street SW, Suite 775
Knoxville, TN 37902

Knox County criminal defense attorney reckless homicide

While it may seem like an excuse, there is something to say about being in the wrong place at the wrong time. The words “murder” and “homicide” raise immediate red flags, often bringing gun violence to mind in this day and age. However, what if you caused a car accident and the other driver’s injuries were fatal? Or perhaps a weapon malfunction while hunting led to your friend’s death? These are two examples of unintentionally causing the death of another person, also known as involuntary manslaughter. The state of Tennessee recognizes that not all deaths, or crimes, are one in the same, and the law reflects this by dividing involuntary manslaughter charges into three separate criminal categories.

Reckless and Criminally Negligent Homicide

Although these two are technically separate charges, the legal descriptions are fairly similar. The state loosely defines criminal negligence and reckless homicide in order to leave room for a number of criminal behaviors to fall within these categories. Reckless homicide occurs when a person is aware of the risks of serious injury or death that their actions pose to the other person, but he or she continues to act and the other person dies as a result. A common example of this is the accidental discharging of a firearm. A more rare occurrence is playing a dangerous game like Russian roulette, where both parties are aware of the potential risks, and one of the individuals dies in the process. 

...

Anderson County criminal defense attorney juvenile crime

Finding out that your child has broken the law and is facing criminal charges for his or her mistake is a difficult pill for parents to swallow. You are likely feeling a combination of emotions—anger and disappointment in your child, concern for his or her future, as well as confusion regarding how the Tennessee court system works for minors. If your child is facing juvenile charges and this is your first time dealing with the Tennessee court system, you may be bursting with questions about how the legal process will work and where your child will end up afterward. It is always advisable to speak with an experienced criminal defense attorney who is familiar with the juvenile court system before taking any further action, but we have compiled a list of frequently asked questions to inform you about the process moving forward.

  1. Is a juvenile hearing just like an adult trial? The short answer to this question is no. While the legal process will still occur in a courtroom in front of a judge and both juveniles and adults have the right to an attorney, juveniles have certain rights that adult offenders do not. For instance, juveniles have a level of confidentiality to their records that adults are not given. Alternatively, juveniles are not allowed a jury trial or the opportunity for bail. 

    ...

Union County criminal defense attorney stalking

With texting, calling, and social media profiles available at the touch of a button, it has never been easier to find someone’s information and continue contacting them over a number of platforms. What may have been considered harassment or stalking 10 years ago has now escalated to include digital outreach. You have likely heard the term “Facebook stalking” or other versions of looking at someone’s public information online. While this term may poke fun at browsing through a person’s social media content, it can be considered a crime if taken too far. 

The Legal Definition of Harassment

There are a number of threatening actions that are considered harassment by Tennessee law. According to Tennessee law, a person who intentionally does the following is committing the criminal offense of harassment:

...

Blount County federal charges defense attorney

Since 1916, the National Park Service has worked to preserve land spanning the United States from destruction. In order to do so, strict regulations have been put into place to protect the wildlife that lives in these parks and preserve the land so that it exists for generations to come. The Great Smoky Mountains National Park houses over 522,000 acres of land that lies between North Carolina and Tennessee. With more than 11.3 million recreational visits in 2016, it is no wonder why specific rules are put in place to keep this land protected. Since the Great Smoky Mountains National Park is federally owned, those who violate these laws can be prosecuted at the federal level and face federal criminal charges and penalties. This level of crime can lead to severe legal consequences, making it crucial to understand the laws before stepping foot on the grounds.

Park Land Is Not Open Land

One of the benefits of the national parks is being able to see wildlife up close and personal. However, not all land in the national parks is open all year round and there are distance regulations put in place to protect the animals. It is strictly forbidden to approach any wildlife within 50 yards or within any distance that disturbs/displaces the wildlife. It is also prohibited to feed the wildlife. Designated fields within the park are closed in May and June as well as in September and October as these are elk calving and breeding seasons. It is a good idea to map your route and do your research before entering the park to be sure that you are complying with the park’s rules.

...

Knox County theft crimes defense attorney

Every city and state has particular crime tendencies that shift year to year, and Tennessee is no exception. There are two levels of offenses identified by Tennessee law enforcement — Group A and Group B. Group A offenses, are much more serious and the list is much longer than Group B. Examples of these include arson, homicide, fraud, and human trafficking. Group B includes offenses such as disorderly conduct and driving under the influence (DUI). There were approximately 552,000 Group A offenses reported in 2018. We have outlined the top five Group A offenses from the most recent data released by the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation. In 2018, the following crimes had the highest numbers:

Simple Assault

There are two levels of assault, with simple assault being a less serious crime. In 2018, a little over 81,000 simple assault cases were reported. A person who knowingly, intentionally, or recklessly inflicts physical injury or causes someone to fear physical injury may be charged with assault. This is a Class A misdemeanor that can lead to incarceration of up to one year and fines up to $15,000.

...
certificate lead counsel ncdd ncdd Elite Lawyer ncdd
Back to Top